Monday, January 26, 2015

Ridiculous Complaints on Singapore Airlines' Services


It's sadly and disappointing to realize that there are a group of people who don't use common sense or think logically but simply to file complaints, just for a reason only... "CUSTOMERS ALWAYS RIGHT." This phenomena is happening as more people begin to feel they have power of spending thus this leads them to believe they are entitled to all kinds of services that they think they deserve. 

It's true you can file any kinds of complaints provided, you don't receive satisfying service(s) or to claim for damages. At the same time, all companies or service industries also set up their rules, policies and guidelines in order to meet customers' needs. Please read through their rulings and policies as well to think carefully before deciding to complain. Otherwise, you will be ended like a fool who make stupid and ridiculous complaint.

Why I Think The Complaints Against SIA Are Complete Rubbish


This Article Originally Appeared On Vulcan Post.
Call Singaporeans an ungrateful, unhappy bunch if you must, but when it comes to our very own national airline, you’d be hard pressed to find another group more protective (and vocal) than we are.

Last week, two separate incidents – both of which were complaints targeted at Singapore Airlines (SIA) – made their rounds online. Singapore netizens were unimpressed, and proceeded to make their dissatisfaction known.

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I might be biased: SIA has been consistently voted one of the best airlines in the world, after all. And the complaints made against SIA were pretty unreasonable, too. So while I can sympathise with a bad in-flight experience (I’ve gotten some of those myself, though not with SIA), I must say that the complaints were unwarranted.

Punctuality

A screenshot of Mr. Varghese's post on SIA's Facebook page.
A screenshot of Mr. Varghese’s post on SIA’s Facebook page.


A screenshot of Mr. Varghese's post on SIA's Facebook page.
A screenshot of Mr. Varghese’s post on SIA’s Facebook page.
Mr. Varghese clearly does not understand how an airport works. The reason airplanes stick to a tight schedule is because there are hundreds of take-offs and landings each day (or one every 90 seconds), and with Changi Airport being one of the busiest in the world, a delay of 5 minutes would have held up more than 3 other planes.

So unless he’s saying that thousands of other people should have waited for him while he was held up in a line at the duty-free shop, I don’t see how the argument that “SIA should have waited for me” is a valid one.

Medical Emergency

A screenshot of Mr. Varghese's post on SIA's Facebook page.
A screenshot of Mr. Varghese’s post on SIA’s Facebook page.
Speaking of valid arguments, here’s an even more ridiculous one. After bombarding SIA’s Facebook page with his list of complaints, Mr. Varghese went on to pose a hypothetical question, asking if SIA would have waited had it been a medical emergency. (Because, you know, it’s such a trauma to have to wait for a next flight! #firstworldproblems)

Well… the thing is, I’m not sure it would be advisable for someone who just had a “medical emergency” to continue with his travel plans in the first place. Wouldn’t it have been safer (not to mention more logical) for him to make a trip to the hospital?

Child Meals

A screenshot or Mr. Tay's complaint to SIA.
A screenshot of Mr. Tay’s complaint to SIA.
For someone who has travelled at least 5 times via plane, you would have thought he’d know better than to assume that he’d get whatever he wanted on board.

Planes have limited capacity (obviously), so why would the airline have prepared baby food if no one had indicated their need for it? Carrying extra weight only adds to fuel costs, so it only makes sense to cut out things like baby food where possible.
As some netizens pointed out, the fact that the cabin crew managed to put together a meal at the last minute was an achievement in itself, and if Mr. Tay found the food unsuitable, perhaps he should have made his requests known when booking his flight.

The advisory for passengers travelling with children Image Credit: singaporeair.com
The advisory for passengers travelling with children 
Image Credit: singaporeair.com
All things considered, it seems the two incidents were simply cases of passengers with serious senses of entitlement. They seem to be frequent travellers too, so it’s almost comical how little they know about the basics of flying etiquette and rules.

The fact that SIA responded to their (non-)complaints is enough to show why the airline remains one of the best in the world. And the (sometimes vulgarity-laced) response by Singaporeans coming to SIA’s defence is just the icing on the cake. So the next time you travel – for goodness’ sakes – please be on time, and if you ever feel the need to make lame complaints against SIA, remember: hell hath no fury like a national airline scorned.

(Source: https://sg.news.yahoo.com/why-think-complaints-against-sia-060036648.html)


Passenger blames S'pore airline for not serving food to his baby -- even though he didn't order any
Posted on 23 January 2015  |  Source: Stomp, Singapore
A Stomper saw this posted on Facebook yesterday (Jan 22) of a man complaining his baby wasn't served any food on a Singapore flight. The passenger had, in fact, not ordered any food for his baby.

The man, Edward Tay, went on to say that food was always served to his baby on four other SQ and MI flights he took, despite him not ordering any.
He was referring to Singapore Airlines and its subsidiary, SilkAir.

After raising a complaint during the flight, he received a platter of biscuits, bread and fresh milk. However, he went on to express his dissatisfaction in the post and said: "Does this look in any way suitable for a 20-month old baby?"
The Stomper, who sent in screengrabs of his posting, said:
"Just saw this on Facebook. Few days back, there was this other guy who missed his flight because he was late for over 50 minutes and blamed SIA for not waiting for him and now this.

"Why are people taking it out on SIA for what seems to be their own mistakes? Are these due to higher expectations of customer service nowadays?"

The passenger's posting has also drawn flak from other facebook users.

One commented: "Please la, it's common sense to preorder food for your kid.
"They were kind enough to give you on previous trips because, maybe, they (had) extra... Don't blame it on the stewardess who was just doing her job."

(Source: http://singaporeseen.stomp.com.sg/singaporeseen/this-urban-jungle/sia-passenger-blames-airline-for-not-serving-food-to-his-baby-even-though-he-didnt)


Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Mercedes covered with Swarovski crystals in London


A smart way to capture public's attention by doing something unusual .....
 



Mercedes covered in a million Swarovski crystals dazzles in London

Russian student Daria Radionova showed off her sparkly Mercedes outside Harrods in Knightsbridge

A diesel Mercedes CLS, thought to be owned by a Russian woman who lives in London, managed to outdo the Arab playboys who drive around the capital by having her car covered in thousands of Swarovski diamonds. The Mercedes caused a stir when it was parked outside a restaurant on Basil Street, near Harrods in Knightsbridge.
A Russian woman who lives in London managed to outdo the Arab playboys who drive around the capital by having her car covered in thousands of Swarovski diamonds Photo: Alex Penfold / SWNS.com
 
A Russian motorist has attracted plenty of attention in the capital while cruising around in a Mercedes covered in a million Swarovski crystals. 
Daria Radionova, 21, wowed Londoners with her sparkly supercar parked outside Harrods in Knightsbridge on 18 September. 
The business student, who paid £20,000 for the crystals, shared pictures of her flashy, customised car on Instagram. 
"I wanted to have something unique and do something special,” she told Mail Online.
 
"The people who did it came over from Russia and worked for 12 hours a day for two months on the car.” 
Dozens of pictures of the Mercedes CLS 350 spotted around London have been posted on social media. 


Ms Radionova says she has no problems cleaning the car and uses a regular sponge and soapy water. 

An influx of million-pound supercars, many belonging to Middle Eastern millionaires, was seen in the capital over the summer. 

(Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/11115753/Mercedes-covered-in-Swarovski-crystals-dazzles-outside-Harrods-in-Knightsbridge.html)