Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Urine Tests to Charge Mobile Battery


This is a compilation from the recent news from China, Singapore and the United Kingdom (UK), where the definition of "URINE TEST" or "URINARY TEST" can be defined and applied differently from the proposed new regulations to maintain bathroom cleanliness and reduce the cases of drink driving and to the findings of the new method to recharge the mobile battery by using the urine.  

Read the news below and find out how amusing they are ...


Spending a penny could cost $16 in Chinese city



People with a poor aim are to be fined if they miss their mark when using public toilets in a Chinese city, officials said -- provoking online derision over how the rule will be enforced.

The penalty will apply to those who urinate outside the bowl of facilities in Shenzhen, the southern boom town neighbouring Hong Kong, although draft regulations seen by AFP did not specify a minimum quantity of spillage required to be classed as a violation.

"Such uncouth use of a public toilet will be fined 100 yuan ($16) by authorities" from next month, a city government official told AFP on Tuesday.
Users of China's rumbustious weibo social networks poured scorn on the measures, raising the prospect of hordes of toilet inspectors being deployed to inspect performance.

"A number of new civil servant positions will be created. There will be a supervisor behind every urinating person to see whether the pee is straight," wrote one poster.

Another added: "Very good measures. I expect they can create 20 jobs on average for every public toilet."

Officials with the department responsible for details of the rules could not immediately be reached for comment by AFP on Tuesday.

The measures have also provoked more considered debate, with one user arguing: "It's better to have no rule than a rule that cannot be implemented."

The Beijing Times carried a commentary calling into question the necessity of making a law on something that "can be simply guided by social consensus".

"The law should maintain the most basic restraint about the people's private life," wrote Shu Li, a legal worker.

Chinese toilet discipline can be notoriously wayward, with pictures of people defecating in public sometimes appearing on weibo.

(Source: http://sg.news.yahoo.com/spending-penny-could-cost-16-chinese-city-061307648.html)


Urinals at a Singapore club analyze pee to keep drunks from driving

Source: MSN Now

Many nightclubs have employed high-tech urinals to assist men in their aim, but one club in Singapore sports urinals that can prevent patrons from harm. The club Zouk has installed urine analyzers in the men's room which detect alcohol content in the bloodstream and recommend a car service if they've had a few too many. The system also detects the valet tickets with RFID chips in the customers' pockets and signals the valets exactly who may be too drunk to drive. Of the 573 drivers the analyzers checked over the course of two weeks, 342 opted for the car service. 
Zouk Anti-Drunk Driving: The Pee Analyser

(Source: http://t.now.msn.com/pee-analyzing-urinals-check-customers-blood-alcohol-levels)


British scientists unveil the 'world's first' mobile phone powered by URINE

  • Bristol Robotics Laboratory and UWE scientists claim to have created a mobile powered by microbial fuel cells that use urine to generate electricity
  • They claim it is the the first time scientists have been able to directly charge the battery of a device using urine
  • The researchers believe their technology could be used in bathrooms in the future to power electric shavers and even showers
By Sarah Griffiths
|

Mobile phone owners could soon be able to give their batteries a boost with their own urine.

British scientists at the Bristol Robotics Laboratory have developed a way of using urine as a power source to generate electricity and claim to have created the world's first microbial fuel cells (MFC) powered mobile phone.

While many people might turn their noses up at the energy source, the researchers said that it is the 'ultimate waste product' and does not rely on the erratic nature of the wind or the sun.

Dr Ioannis Ieropoulos in his laboratory at the Bristol Robotics Laboratory holding a phone powered by a microbial fuel cell stack
Scientists believe they have created the first mobile phone to run on urine. Dr Ioannis Ieropoulos is pictured at the Bristol Robotics Laboratory holding a phone powered by a microbial fuel cell stack

WHAT ARE MFCS?

  • Microbial fuel cells are energy converters that turn organic matter directly into electricity by utilising the metabolism of live micro-organisms
  • The electricity is a by-product of the microbes’ natural life cycle
  • The more they eat things like urine, the more energy they generate and for longer periods of time
  • The electricity output of MFCs is relatively small and the researchers are currently only been able to store and accumulate low levels of energy into capacitors for short charge and discharge cycles.
  • They claim that this is the first time that scientists have been able to directly charge the battery of a device such as a mobile phone and it should be seen as a significant breakthrough
The scientists shared their breakthrough in the Royal Society of Chemistry Journal of Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics.

Dr Ioannis Ieropoulos, an expert at harnessing power from unusual sources using microbial fuel cells at the University of West England, Bristol, which was also involved in the research, said the urine-powered phone is a 'world first'.

'No-one has harnessed power from urine so it’s an exciting discovery.
 
'Using the ultimate waste product as a source of power to produce electricity is about as eco as it gets.

'One product that we can be sure of an unending supply is our own urine. 

'By harnessing this power as urine passes through a cascade of MFCs, we have managed to charge a Samsung mobile phone.
He believes that the reliability of the fuel source is a big selling point.

A number of fuel cells are pictured. They use urine as a source of power to produce electricity
A number of fuel cells are pictured. They use urine as a source of power to produce electricity. By harnessing this power, researchers have managed to charge a Samsung mobile phone

'The beauty of this fuel source is that we are not relying on the erratic nature of the wind or the sun; we are actually re-using waste to create energy.

'So far the microbial fuel power stack that we have developed generates enough power to enable SMS messaging, web browsing and to make a brief phone call.'

However, he said that making a long call on a mobile phone is far more power hungry.
 
'Making a call on a mobile phone takes up the most energy but we will get to the place where we can charge a battery for longer periods. 
 
'The concept has been tested and it works - it’s now for us to develop and refine the process so that we can develop MFCs to fully charge a battery.'

Microbial fuel cells are energy converters that turn organic matter directly into electricity by utilising the metabolism of live micro-organisms. 

Dr Ieropoulos said: 'Essentially, the electricity is a by-product of the microbes’ natural life cycle, so the more they eat things like urine, the more energy they generate and for longer periods of time.'

A single microbial fuel cell is pictured
A single microbial fuel cell is pictured. The MFCs are energy converters that turn organic matter directly into electricity by utilising the metabolism of live micro-organisms

The electricity output of MFCs is relatively small and the researchers are currently only been able to store and accumulate low levels of energy into capacitors for short charge and discharge cycles. 

However they claim that this is the first time that scientists have been able to directly charge the battery of a device such as a mobile phone and it should be seen as a significant breakthrough.
They believe that their research, which was funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, the Gates Foundation and the Technology Strategy Board, has the potential to be installed in bathrooms.

The scientists think that the technology could be installed into domestic bathrooms int he future to harness the urine and produce sufficient electricity to power showers and lighting...or at least electric shavers.

Dr Ieropoulos said: 'We are currently bidding for funding to work alongside partners in the US and South Africa to develop a smart toilet. Watch this space.'

(Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2365856/British-scientists-unveil-worlds-mobile-phone-powered-URINE.html#ixzz2cZp7TUlR)

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